In elections, Kenyans dutifully line up to choose their leaders but when mayhem associated with the outcome breaks out, they suffer.

Mwananchi always bears pain of elections chaos

During Kenya’s National Election held on August 8, 2017, about 15 million Kenyans turned out to vote their favourite candidates at the local and national levels.

However, as soon as the results were tallied and presidential aspirant Uhuru Kenyatta declared the winner with 54.3 per cent of the vote against his rival former Prime Minister Raila Odinga, who garnered 44.7 per cent, the Opposition refused to accept the results and said their was mass rigging and took their complaint before the Supreme Court.

After various lawyers’ arguments before the seven-member Supreme Court, Uhuru’s victory was nullified and a fresh election ordered within 60 days.

Kenyans always suffer during elections. Photo: Courtesy

Kenyans always suffer during elections. Photo: Courtesy

The decision elicited praise by Mr Odinga while Kenyatta heavily criticised the Supreme Court.

The effect of the judges’ announcement had immediate effect that touched on the lives of Kenyans.

For example, within minutes of the announcement the stock market crashed.

The Kenyan shilling also weakened.

With an unstable country at the moment, very few investors would want to invest in the Kenya.

Many Kenyan businesses have been affected since the start of the campaigns. Some shops are yet to be reopened due to insecurity fears.

Farming is also feeling the drought of politics.

Some farm workers took leave to go to their rural areas to vote but are yet to return.

With a fresh election looming they are likely to stay in their homes and wait for the new election results to be announced before they decide their next move.

They are likely to go to work when all normalcy has returned. It may take a few months for the Kenyan economy to bounce back on track.

Supreme judges during the presidential petition hearing in August 2017.

Supreme judges during the presidential petition hearing in August 2017.

While this spells doom for many people who will wait longer to have normalcy, the politicians don’t seem to care.

Some leaders such as Moses Kuria have been quoted in the media spewing hatred against fellow Kenyans.

Unless Kenyatta and Odinga encourage their supporters to be orderly and peaceful as they go to vote again on the new date of October 17, things do not look so bright for Mwananchi as anxiety looms in the country.

With the 2007/2008 Post election violence still fresh, Kenyans fear a repeat of the same ugly mayhem recurring. 

Supreme Court judges listen to lawyers during the hearing. Photo: Courtesy

Supreme Court judges listen to lawyers during the hearing. Photo: Courtesy

Elections in Kenya are held every five years and they are an integral part of Kenya’s democracy, which has grown over the years.

The latest Supreme Court ruling has only happened to one African democracy and three countries in the world and is therefore unique and should be applauded.

 




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